Start Comparison of non sedating antihistamines

Comparison of non sedating antihistamines

Long-term use of Antivert is inappropriate, and the drug may be overprescribed in the primary care setting.

Antivert (meclizine hydrochloride) is an antihistamine. According to the Physicians’ Desk Reference, it is effective for “management of vertigo associated with diseases affecting the vestibular system.” Antivert is not recommended for complaints of unsteadiness, disequilibrium, loss of balance, or pre-syncopal lightheadedness.

However, since suppressant medications may hinder the function of the vestibular apparatus at a time when the patient is most dependent upon it, these patients actually may experience greater symptoms.

In 1972 a randomized, double-blind crossover study indicated that meclizine had a greater effect than a placebo on diminishing symptoms and signs of vertigo of vestibular origin.

The medication group was treated with Valium or meclizine, both centrally sedating medications.

Over a six-week treatment period, all groups reported a reduction in symptoms, but only the vestibular rehabilitation group showed significant objective improvement in scores obtained from posturography and standing balance tests.

It is not recommended for complaints of unsteadiness, loss of balance, and disequilibrium, whether of vestibular origin or not.

Vertigo related to BPPV is better treated through Canalith repositioning techniques.

Postural Control Two recent studies demonstrate the efficacy of vestibular therapy vs.